Double exposures

52 Doubles: roll 3, 4 and 5

It has been a while since I blogged here, and since I've shared results from my 52 rolls project. That project was finished in 2015. The rolls were already developed, but I was too busy to share. 

Anyway, here are the results of rolls 3, 4 and 5!

Roll 3: Holga 120N and Kodak E100G, crossprocessed

Roll 4: Holga 120N and Kodak T-Max 100

Roll 5: Holga 120N and Lomography Redscale 100 iso

It was a lot of fun doing this project. Might do something similar for 2017....

52 Doubles: roll 2

Roll 2 from my 52 Doubles project has been shot some time ago. I forgot to blog about it.... Anyway, here are the results from the second roll. Again, I used the Holga 120N, loaded with a roll of Fuji Provia 100 this time.

Like on the first roll, I'm not fond of all the images. I'm happy there are some really nice ones in this bunch though.

52 Doubles: roll 1

Last year I did a 52 rolls project. Due to some personal stuff I decided not to continue this. However, I thought that 52 double exposures should be doable in 2015. To do so, I bought a Holga 120N. I already had a Holga 120GN and it's one of my favourite cameras. Since I wanted to add another Holga to my collection, a dedicated one for the project seemed like a good idea. I loaded the Holga with Lomography CN100 and shot a double exposure every week.

Here are the results of roll 1:

As you can see, not all of the doubles were a big success. But there are some on this roll that I really like.

Doubles and film swaps

I have been making double exposures and taking part in film swaps for a while now. It's fun to do them, and usually the results are very surprising. Sometimes in a good way, and sometimes a complete failure.... In this blogpost I'll try to explain how to do doubles.

When doing a double exposure you expose the same bit of film twice. When doing a film swap, one person shoots a roll of film, rewinds it, and someone else will shoot it again. Either way, you'll end up with two pictures stacked on top of each other. The success rate depends on a couple of factors. 

 Double exposure (LC-A+ and Tungsten 64 film). I first shot the text, and then the street.

Double exposure (LC-A+ and Tungsten 64 film). I first shot the text, and then the street.

 Film swap with Brendan a.k.a.  Awareofthevoid  (Fuji Superia 200). I shot the street art as the first layer. Brendan then shot the second layer at a cemetery.

Film swap with Brendan a.k.a. Awareofthevoid (Fuji Superia 200). I shot the street art as the first layer. Brendan then shot the second layer at a cemetery.

Underexposure

When doing doubles or a film swap, underexpose both layers. Otherwise you'll end up with an overexposed shot or film. I usually shoot 200 iso film at 400 iso, 100 iso film at 200, etc. On most cameras this is easy to do. Just set the iso manually and you'll be fine. If you do a film swap, inform your swap partner about the underexposure. Not everyone knows this.

Base layer

For the base layer I try to come up with interesting things. In my opinion there are some subjects that work really great as a base layer: text, neon lights, graffiti, structures and patterns such as bricks, tiles and pebbles and heavy contrasts (black and white objects, silhouettes or trees in the woods). Try to avoid too many light or large white objects in your base layer. Anything white will stay white in the second layer. Unless..... you want to play with this.

 Double exposure (Holga 120GN and Kodak E100VS). My first layer was the statue with a very light background. My second layer was a shot of love locks on a bridge. It creates a silhouette with a pattern filling. You can see that the locks from the second layer do not show in the almost white sky from the first layer.

Double exposure (Holga 120GN and Kodak E100VS). My first layer was the statue with a very light background. My second layer was a shot of love locks on a bridge. It creates a silhouette with a pattern filling. You can see that the locks from the second layer do not show in the almost white sky from the first layer.

Second layer

If I shoot the second layer, I look for bright coloured objects such as flowers and traffic signs. Portraits also work.

 Film swap with Stephan a.k.a.  Mephisto19  (Lomography Lomochrome 100). Stephan shot his layer at a photography fair, taking a portrait of a friend of his. I shot my layer in a park.

Film swap with Stephan a.k.a. Mephisto19 (Lomography Lomochrome 100). Stephan shot his layer at a photography fair, taking a portrait of a friend of his. I shot my layer in a park.

Redscale

Doubles or film swaps work great in combination with redscale fim. Redscale film is difficult to overexpose, and when doing doubles you don't need to underexpose both layers. It is possible to make your own redscale film. My friend Brendan has written a great tutorial about it. I have done several film swaps where one person shoots the normal side of the film (at box speed), turns the film around to make a redscale out of it, and the next person then shoots the redscale side of it. It is often referred to as a "redscale flip".

 Film swap with Brendan a.k.a. Awareofthevoid. I shot my layer in a zoo, at box speed on the normal side of the film. Brendan redscaled the film and shot a portrait on the redscale side.

Film swap with Brendan a.k.a. Awareofthevoid. I shot my layer in a zoo, at box speed on the normal side of the film. Brendan redscaled the film and shot a portrait on the redscale side.

HQME

Redscale film is also very good for making HQME, or High Quantity Multiple Exposures. That means exposing the frame several times. When I do them, I usually expose a frame 15 to 20 times, moving my camera around a little bit.

 HQME of the Astronomical clock in Prague (Holga 120GN and Lomography Redscale XR50-200). I made about 20 exposures of the clock on one frame.

HQME of the Astronomical clock in Prague (Holga 120GN and Lomography Redscale XR50-200). I made about 20 exposures of the clock on one frame.

Other tips and tricks

Also important: don't underexpose too much. This might result in one of the layers not showing at all. That also goes for shooting in low contrast areas or areas that are too dark. Try to keep your camera horizontal. I have made this error several times in the past. If you use both horizontal and vertical shots during a film swap, the results are usually very messy. If you want to try and line up the film for a film swap, you can use a marker to mark the first frame. That way the next shooter knows how to line up the film. Warning: this does not work for redscale flips, as the entire film gets flipped around.

If you are interested in doing a film swap with me send me an email. I'm always interested! You can also join the Facebook group I've created.